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As seniors age, there comes a time they may need additional support with activities of daily living. While some older adults and adult children consider home care, many opt for senior care options like an assisted living community.

If you are trying to find ways to encourage a move to senior living for your parent, we’re here to help. Below you will find some of the top reasons seniors put off a move to assisted living and ways you can support them.

Your Guide to Encouraging Assisted Living for Aging Parents: Reasons They May Avoid a Move

Reason 1 | They Have Negative Perceptions.

Many seniors view assisted living communities like the nursing homes of the past. However, they are now far from the hospital-like environments they used to be. In fact, they offer so much more than just healthcare. Show your loved one what assisted living communities are like now by scheduling a visit to experience it firsthand.

As you both discover the enriching lifestyle, chat with residents, meet team members, and see what assisted living has to offer, you’ll easily bust the myths and the negative perceptions your loved one may have about assisted living.

Reason 2 | They Fear a Loss of Independence.

Some seniors may fear a loss of independence when moving to assisted living. After making a move, however, many seniors and their family members express that they wish they had done so sooner. This is often because with the right amount of support, seniors thrive with a full lifestyle, new friends and convenient amenities just outside their door.

If your mom or dad is still worried about a loss of independence, or that they won’t be able to be as active as they once were, sharing how a move can benefit them may help. Some of these advantages include:

  • Access to support when needed
  • Maintenance-free lifestyle
  • Ability to create their own schedule
  • Daily programs, clubs and events
  • Gourmet meals with fresh, seasonal selections
  • More time to focus on activities they want to pursue

Reason 3 | They Want to Remain at Home.

There are a couple of reasons your parents may want to stay in their home. For example, your mom or dad may not want to move because they raised their families there and it houses many of their positive memories. They may not want to leave behind neighbors they have gotten to know well over the years, or they may simply be afraid to step outside their comfort zone and leave their home for something unknown.

While these reasons are valid and understandable, it is important to share how their future may be impacted by remaining at home. Some helpful points may include:

  • What staying at home may cost, including maintenance, taxes, repairs, and alterations to allow for aging in place
  • Who will be available to care for them, and what happens when needs increase
  • How the costs of 24-hour at home care compare to moving to an assisted living facility
  • What happens if they have a sudden health emergency and support at home isn’t available

If their decision not to move is more about the fact they have an emotional attachment to their home, share how memories aren’t tied to the house and instead are in their heart. It can help to spend some time with them taking photographs of spaces within the home that hold their most treasured memories. Write the memories down in a photo album so they can preserve them while having a physical reminder.

Reason 4 | They Prefer to Wait.

Sometimes aging parents are willing to move to senior housing but only when they feel it’s truly needed. It’s also possible they may not want to admit they need more help, or they feel guilty putting the burden of moving on you. This can be detrimental for various reasons:

  • Waiting to move can limit your loved one’s ability to make the decision on their own
  • If care needs increase, you may need to make the decision, or you parent may be rushed to choose
  • It lessens time to explore options that suit them best
  • You may be overwhelmed without adequate support
  • Your parent may not be able to enjoy the community before health changes occur

Remind your loved one that one of the greatest benefits of moving to senior living is getting to take advantage of all the community has to offer – from convenient amenities and engaging programs to new friends and a dedicated staff ready to serve. If your loved one waits until their health is compromised, they may not be able to fully enjoy all that a community like Waterstone of Lexington has to offer.

Reason 5 | They’re Anxious.

Your mom or dad may be nervous about making a move, meeting new people, making new friends, fitting in, and feeling at home. To help them feel more comfortable:

  • Visit the community often prior to moving
  • Attend programs ahead of time, giving them the opportunity to make friends
  • Talk to the life enrichment team, who can share activities and events that may interest your loved one
  • Make their space look as much like home as possible

How To Begin the Conversation About Assisted Living

If it’s time to start this conversation with your parents, you’ll want to make sure you’re well educated and prepared. Try these tips:

  • Make sure the mood is pleasant
  • Don’t tell them what to do; simply share your observations about their living situation
  • Express your love and concern
  • Explain how senior living could enhance their lifestyle
  • Let them know you’ll feel better knowing they’ll receive support when needed
  • Listen to their concerns and share your own feelings
  • Talk with their family, friends, faith leaders and doctor, and ask them to assist with the conversation if needed

We’re Here for You and Your Loved One Through Every Step of the Transition to Assisted Living

At Waterstone of Lexington, we are always here to support you and your parents. For more advice on how to encourage a senior to move to assisted living, contact us or schedule a visit today.

If your loved one has already decided to make a move to a retirement community and you’re searching for resources on how to best prepare, check out our recent blog on preparing a loved one for a move to assisted living.

WATERSTONE OF LEXINGTON: NOW THIS IS HOME

Waterstone of Lexington is opening soon and will offer a modern approach to retirement living in a historical setting with concierge services and impressive amenities. Come see how we redefine independent living and assisted living with a visit today.

For many older adults and family members, the time may eventually come to discuss a move to a senior living or assisted living community. Whether the move is for enhanced social opportunities or additional levels of care, it can be a difficult conversation to have. For some, they may look forward to a move immensely; for other older adults, it may take significant consideration, making it a slower process. Either way, however, many find they wish they’d made a move sooner.

Signs It’s Time to Make a Move to an Assisted Living Community

Are you wondering if it’s time for your loved one to make a move to assisted living? Check out these signs that a move may be beneficial:

  • Your loved one needs support with activities of daily living, like dressing, bathing or medication management.
  • They are feeling isolated in their own home.
  • The search for home care is becoming exhausting.
  • Your loved one requires more support than you can provide at home.
  • They prefer to receive care from someone who is not a family member.

Preparing for a Move to Assisted Living: Tips To Support a Loved One

How can you best prepare a loved one for a move to assisted living? First, it’s important to realize it’s a process that requires preparation before the move, during the move and even afterward. Try our tips to help guide you through every step of the journey.

Before the Move

If you are going to be talking to a loved one about moving to an assisted living community, it’s a good idea to gauge their interest first. Use their answers to the questions below to guide your conversation. Be respectful of their thoughts and opinions, but also remember to be honest about your concerns about them remaining at home. Above all, be sure that the conversation remains calm and pleasant; if it moves in another direction, revisit the discussion at a later time.

  • Are they eager to move?
  • Do they have any concerns about a move?
  • Do they feel that they would benefit from additional support?
  • Do they have a specific community in mind?

It’s always a good idea to tour a variety of assisted living communities. Each has a different atmosphere, services may vary – and your loved one may not feel at home at every community you tour. Make a list, schedule some visits, and evaluate each according to your loved one’s wishes and preferences.

Once you’ve set the location of the move and your loved one is ready to take the next step, it’s time to start the packing and downsizing process. Before diving into this step, however, it’s best to keep yourself on track by creating a moving checklist. This won’t just help you stay organized, but it can also prevent the need to remember everything off the top of your head. Make sure this list is in a prominent place that all eyes can see.

On the checklist, write out some things you are going to need, including:

  • Moving supplies, like lifting equipment and hand trucks, if you aren’t hiring a mover. If you need help moving larger items, a moving truck can help.
  • Packing supplies, like moving boxes, packing paper and foam, bubble wrap and packing tape.
  • Essential items to remember when packing belongings, like clothing, medications, hobby items and family photos.
  • Important goal dates, ensuring you’re on time with the moving process.

During the Downsizing Process

As the move inches closer and you begin the process of moving in, refer back to your checklist to make sure you have everything you need. Then, it’s time to start downsizing. We know that the process can feel overwhelming, but with these tips, it will be easier.

  • Make a list of where you want to begin. Some choose to tackle the smaller spaces, like closets, first. Others like to begin downsizing larger living spaces.
  • If you have help, ask others to take care of spaces that you know won’t be difficult to go through so you can cross those off the list. Otherwise, make sure to tackle one room at a time to reduce clutter.
  • Evaluate what needs to stay and what needs to go. For example, if you know your loved one will not need their large collection of kitchen tools, pack those away to donate or to give to a family member.
  • Consider renting a dumpster so you can toss any necessary items versus starting a pile.
  • Designate someone to take items to the donation center daily so that those items are out of the way.
  • As you pack, carefully label boxes that will be taken with you so you know where to put them when unpacking in their new assisted living community.

Moving Day

When the day finally arrives, focus on settling your loved one in, helping them get comfortable, and ensuring they have everything they need in their new space. To make move-in day go smoother:

  • Pack the moving truck or your cars the night before.
  • Enjoy breakfast together.
  • Complete any finishing touches on packing.
  • Provide support for your loved one if needed.
  • Invite friends or family to unpack with you.
  • Decorate right away, if possible, to make their space feel more like home.

After the Move

Once your loved one is settled in, there are still things you can do to help them feel more at home.

  • Introduce yourself and your loved one to neighbors.
  • Schedule extra times to come visit.
  • Check in with their care team to see how they are adjusting.
  • Point out events on the community’s schedule they might enjoy.
  • Periodically ask how your loved one is feeling.
  • Encourage them to get involved.

Over time, your loved one will feel more at home, and you’ll enjoy peace of mind knowing they are safe, engaged and well-cared for. If you would like to learn more about moving to assisted living or to schedule a visit at Waterstone of Lexington, contact us today.

WATERSTONE OF LEXINGTON: NOW THIS IS HOME

Waterstone of Lexington – opening fall 2022 – will offer a modern approach to retirement living in a historical setting with concierge services and impressive amenities. Come see how we redefine independent living and assisted living with a visit to our Welcome Center in Belmont.

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Wellesley

10 Tips for a Smooth Transition to Assisted Living

Moving to assisted living in a senior living community can be a daunting process, especially if your parents have lived in their home for many years. Fortunately, there are many things you can do to streamline the transition to assisted living.

Once you and your loved one have decided it is the right time, there are several steps that you should take to prepare for a move to assisted living. Our tips below will cover the period leading up to the move and ways to help your loved one settle comfortably into their new home.

How To Prepare for the Move


1. Find a community that fits your loved one’s needs.
First, think about your loved one’s lifestyle, preferences and needs. Consider which amenities and services might be most important for your loved one – and which you might not need in a community. To avoid having to make a rushed decision due to a crisis or situation that requires an immediate move, start the process as early as possible. It’s never too early to start considering your options.


2. Visit communities to see them in person.
The best way to get to know a community is to visit it in person. It gives you a wonderful opportunity to meet the team – and even the current residents – to get firsthand insight into the lifestyle, care and services. Often, you’ll have the chance to enjoy a meal in the dining room or attend an event on campus. This will help you gauge what community will best fit with your loved one’s personality, interests and needs.

3. Prioritize as you help your loved one pack.
You don’t have to pack everything right away; prioritize the most important items first. You can organize the process by creating lists, such as items your loved one wants to take along to their new home or those to be passed down as a family heirloom. Another good tip is to start in one room – and then move on to the next. Focus on creating a plan for the bigger items first, and then work on putting smaller items into keep, donate or throw away piles. Try to break the process into simple, smaller tasks.

4. Take time to consider logistics.
If your loved one will be living in a new community, make a list of tasks to be completed such as canceling ongoing utilities and forwarding mail to their new community address from the postal service. Remember to update their new address with medical offices, insurance, financial institutions and social security.  The community where your loved one is moving can also be a great resource to help you with these logistical items.

5. Give your loved one time to adjust emotionally.
The transition to a senior living community can bring up a range of emotions for a senior loved one, especially when leaving a long-time family home. These feelings are completely normal when preparing to move to a new home. One of the best ways to overcome fears is to talk about them. Encourage your loved one to talk to family members and friends about the positives that come along with a move.

6. Give your loved ones a hand as they set up their new space.
Getting your loved ones used to their new living space is the best way to help them feel comfortable. Help them arrange their furniture and decorations in a way that they like. Finding the right place to display items that can make your loved ones feel at home.

Tips for the First Week in Senior Living

1. Encourage your loved one to meet their neighbors.

Your loved one will likely become good friends with their new neighbors, and you should encourage them to introduce themselves. At Waterstone at Wellesley, a Welcoming Committee is assigned to help residents adjust to community life. Ask if the community offers a similar program to support new residents.

2. Encourage your loved one to get to know the team.
One of the best ways for new residents to feel more at home is to get to know the team members who are there to support and care for them. Among the people your loved one will meet are the management team, nurses, dining staff, maintenance providers, the life enrichment team, and fitness instructors. Tell your loved one not to be afraid to ask any questions they may have about the community’s services – at any time. It is the job of the entire team to make your loved one feel comfortable.

3. Be sure to spend time with your loved one.
The first few weeks in the community are particularly crucial. Aim to visit your loved one regularly, if possible, to help encourage a smooth and healthy transition into the community. Your loved one will appreciate the support and knowledge that you are there for them. If you can’t visit, talk with the community team about regular calls, video chats or other ways you can support your loved one with the move from a distance.

4. Promote participation in community events.

Check out the social calendar for the community and find ways to get your loved one interested in attending the various social, cultural and educational events. Learning about the available amenities and getting to know other residents is a great way to start off. Encourage your loved one to start with activities they are sure to like – and then branch out from there. They may just discover a new favorite hobby!

Waterstone at Wellesley. Now This Is Home.

Waterstone at Wellesley offers independent living and assisted living options in beautiful Wellesley, along the banks of the Charles River.

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Wellesley

Differences Between Independent Living and Assisted Living

If you’re thinking about a new home for your loved one but are unsure whether they need independent living or assisted living, you might be glad to know that there are really more similarities than differences when it comes to the lifestyle. Both can help your loved one enjoy an active, enriching lifestyle – whether or not they need some additional support to remain living independently.

Read on to learn more about how you can make an informed decision about which type of care would best meet your loved one’s needs.

Key Differences Between Independent Living and Assisted Living

If you’re looking for a new place for your aging loved one, you’ll probably come across various assisted and independent living options. While both types of living are beneficial for your loved one, it can be helpful to understand the differences between the two.

Independent Living

Independent living offers private apartments with the support of regular housekeeping, maintenance services and access to a range of community amenities to make life easy and carefree. Many communities, such as Waterstone at Wellesley, also offer dining plans and options with delicious chef-prepared selections. Independent living residents also enjoy a range of social, cultural and recreational programs surrounded by friends with similar interests.

Independent living apartments can vary from studio to two-bedroom and larger. At Waterstone at Wellesley, our premier apartments feature modern touches and elevated details that make residents feel right at home.

Most seniors who move into independent living do not require assistance with the tasks of daily living, such as bathing, dressing or medication management. In independent living, the focus is not on care but on eliminating chores and responsibilities – making seniors’ lives as fulfilling, rewarding and worry-free as possible. However, for those who do require some support to remain living independently, it is helpful to know that some independent living communities, such as Waterstone at Wellesley, do allow on-demand care and supportive services to be delivered to residents within their private apartments.

Assisted Living

Assisted living can be an ideal option for those who are experiencing health problems or safety concerns and can no longer live independently. Within an assisted living community, they are structured to provide more personal care and medical oversight – with a focus on providing just the right balance between lifestyle and support.

At Waterstone at Wellesley, for example, assisted living residents receive customized care plans that provide support with the activities of daily living (ADLs), medication management and three nutritious, chef-prepared meals each day. With the right care in place, residents can lead independent lives and take full advantage of the services, amenities and engaging lifestyle that Waterstone is known to provide.

Enriching Lifestyle

No matter which living option is selected, residents enjoy a more comfortable, carefree lifestyle and a sense of community and connection. With both independent and assisted living, residents benefit from wellness-focused programs and activities that are designed to keep them healthy and happy.

At Waterstone at Wellesley, independent and assisted living residents have everything they need to live their best lives – and families can rest assured knowing their loved ones are in good hands.

Waterstone at Wellesley. Now This Is Home.

Waterstone at Wellesley offers independent living and assisted living options in the heart of Wellesley, MA.  Contact us for more information.

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Wellesley

5 Simple Tips for Choosing an Assisted Living Community

Sometimes, the prospect of a move to senior living can give you ‘option paralysis’ – in other words, there’s so many choices that it’s too difficult to determine what is best for your specific circumstances.

Finding the right assisted living community requires time, effort and patience. In your search for a place to call home for yourself or a loved one, it’s important to focus your attention on a handful of key factors. These boil down to services, location, size, cost and overall culture.

Here are the five areas to explore when choosing the right assisted living community for your loved one.

The 5 Factors to Consider When Looking for an Assisted Living Community

Before transitioning to an assisted living community, you have to be sure it’s a good fit for yourself or a loved one.

It’s estimated that by 2023, 60% of senior living communities will offer wellness lifestyles, according to data from the International Council on Active Aging. This is a clear sign of an upward trend in senior living, where a holistic approach is favored. Waterstone at Wellesley is ahead of the curve, offering an enriching lifestyle that emphasizes all aspects of wellness – body, mind and spirit.

Realistically, any community that places emphasis on quality of life, compassion and personal care will likely offer the services you need. With this philosophy in mind, it’s important that you look for a community that meets your individual needs and preferences in each of the following five areas.

  1. Services Offered
    Explore the services offered by the community. Come to your research process prepared by knowing the level of care you or your loved one may need. For example, if your loved one will require medication management, double-check that the service is provided. If you have special dietary requirements, ask if the dining service team will be able to accommodate them.
  2. Location of the Community
    Do you want a place near where you live, near where your loved one currently lives, or something in between? The answer to this question will be personal. Maybe there are other reasons you’re going for a specific location.If possible, it’s a good idea to travel to the community with a family member to see it for yourself. Though it may add more work to the search process for the ideal assisted living community, visiting a community and seeing all that it has to offer will tell you more than anything on the internet ever could.
  3. Size and Style of the Community
    Senior care is a community endeavor, as much about building intentional neighborhoods as it is living a lifestyle focused on wellness. Be sure that the community is the right size – and style – for you. Does the community feel right to you and offer the amenities you’re looking for to promote an active, healthy lifestyle? Does it offer the atmosphere that you are accustomed to and that makes you or your loved one feel at home?
  4. Cost of Living
    Depending on the community, older adults will have a variety of ways to pay for assisted living services. Go over care and housing options with the community’s Senior Advisor and/or your own personal financial advisor before coming to a decision. Look at the type of community in question, the spectrum of care and contract type. Consider everything that is included at each community you visit to be sure you’re comparing “apples to apples.”
  5. Community Culture
    Arguably the most important aspect of any community is its culture. For assisted living residents, community culture can be elements big or small. When you visit, get a feel for the environment and people. Watch how residents interact with team members. Check out the lifestyle and how engaging the programs are. Does the community’s overall feel and culture align with what you envisioned for your or your loved one’s new home?

Ensure the community offers everything needed to encourage the lifestyle you desire. Maybe your loved one likes the theater or spending a quiet afternoon in the library. Perhaps they enjoy a little personal training or a tai chi session. How about a game night or art class? Look for a place that will help you or your loved one feel comfortable and at home – and possibly help you step slightly out of your comfort zone to experience new, exciting things.

Waterstone at Wellesley: Now This Is Home.

Waterstone at Wellesley offers premier independent living and supportive assisted living options in the heart of Wellesley in beautiful Massachusetts. Contact us to schedule a personal visit and explore our dynamic senior living community.

A recent article in Senior Housing News reported that while many older adults see themselves remaining at home as they age, they viewed moving to an assisted living community as a better option than moving in with family members.

This was one of the key findings in a recent survey by Retirement Living Information Center. The online retirement resource website surveyed over 2,300 seniors. Thirty percent of respondents said if they became unable to live on their own, they preferred assisted living communities over living with family.

The Challenges of Multigenerational Living

“Deciding whether to stay at home or move in with an adult child or family member can be a tricky one,” says Devon Sicard, Executive Director at Waterstone at Wellesley. “Before making any decisions, it’s important to consider the emotional, financial and logistical aspects of it.”

The Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA) warns that seniors who move in with family members often struggle with the inevitable change in familial roles. “Adult children have to accept they may have to parent their parents while the older adult still feels authoritative despite his or her health condition,” says Devon.

Devon emphasizes the importance of having a frank discussion with the aging parents before making the arrangement. “Lay some ground rules and talk about how it’s all going to work,” Devon says. “Talk about mealtimes, bedtimes, household responsibilities, how guests will be handled and how much time should be set aside for socialization. The need for care services provided by home healthcare organizations should also be assessed.”

Families must also make sure they have the physical – and financial – means to provide a home for their loved ones. Some may have to adapt or expand their home to make it more comfortable or senior-ready.

MarketWatch points out that there are a host of legal and financial matters to sort out before a move takes place. The news source suggests figuring out whether the parent will be contributing to household costs and, if so, how much? Can the caregiver claim the parent as a dependent? In addition, families should have a will in place to protect their parents’ legal rights.

Many seniors fear losing their independence should they move in with a loved one. Retaining as much independence as possible is one of the main reasons why so many seniors think moving to an independent living community or assisted living facility may be a better choice. 

Senior living communities – whether they offer independent living, assisted living or both – are becoming the go-to for seniors who find they need a little support to live their best lives. Devon says that most residents who move to Waterstone at Wellesley need some level of support or assistance with the activities of daily living, personal care and medication reminders.

“The truth is that when seniors move into a community, they find they enjoy the active, vibrant lifestyle very much,” says Devon. “They love having access to community amenities that make such a difference in overall well-being and quality of life. Living at home doesn’t include built-in amenities like fitness and wellness centers, indoor swimming pools, gourmet dining in multiple venues, indoor and outdoor community gathering spaces, putting greens, spas and much more.”

Senior living communities can be a happy solution for seniors and their families. Below are a few reasons why seniors say they prefer a senior living community over living with their families: 

Maintenance and worry-free living – The everyday chores that come with owning a home are all completely taken care of. 

Live social – Senior living communities offer countless daily activities, entertainment and social opportunities. There’s never a dull moment (unless you want there to be), and there are always new friends and neighbors around to ensure you are never alone (unless you want to be).

Good nutrition and great food – In assisted living or other senior living communities, there is no shortage of healthy, delicious foods. Families can rest assured that their loved ones have well-balanced meals that provide the right nutritional support.

One monthly payment – One monthly payment includes everything residents need to thrive. You don’t have to worry about paying utility bills, taxes, phone, etc. It’s all included in your monthly bill.

Transportation – Forget navigating traffic and icy roads during the winter months! Communities like Waterstone offer complimentary transportation to and from doctor appointments, errands and more.

Confidence of care – Adult children enjoy the peace of mind that comes from knowing their loved ones are enjoying a full life and that support and assistance are available if they’re needed. 

Beautiful Riverfront Community

Located on the banks of the Charles River, Waterstone is Wellesley’s only senior living community, offering premier independent and assisted living. But that’s only the first of many differences that sets Waterstone above and beyond other communities.

Celebrating Dynamic Living

Here, our residents live independently in their own private, spacious apartments – but without any worries or concerns about homeownership or living alone. All meals are expertly prepared. There aren’t any chores to be concerned with. No home maintenance or repairs to worry about. Just opportunities around every corner and time to spend as they choose – in the company of new friends.

Our vibrant community encourages residents to engage in a variety of recreational, cultural and social programs and activities. Enjoy a fitness class. Swim in the sunny indoor pool. Take a stroll on a walking path. Partake in a favorite hobby or pastime. Discover a new interest. With Waterstone at Wellesley, there’s a world of opportunity waiting right outside our residents’ doors.

Future Peace of Mind

The hallmark of Waterstone assisted living is the peace of mind we provide both our residents and their families. Knowing that care and support are available right on site instills a sense of confidence and calm one can’t find living alone.

For prospective residents or their families interested in residing at Waterstone at Wellesley, please contact us at ​781.591.7113.

Categories
Wellesley

What Does a Typical Day in Assisted Living Look Like?

If you or someone you know is considering moving into assisted living, one of the first questions you may have is, “what does a typical day look like?”

“Care communities may once have been boring and uninspiring places, but that’s simply not the case anymore,” says Devon Sicard, Executive Director of Waterstone at Wellesley.“Today, communities that offer personal care or other kinds of long-term care have all sorts of services included that make life enjoyable, fulfilling and enriching.”

Devon says that these types of facilities are focused on providing medical care, personal care and opportunities to present choice and convenience for older adults. “Just because an older adult may require additional assistance in order to live an independent lifestyle doesn’t mean that they should have to give up a lifestyle that they enjoy,” she explains. “Today, assisted living communities offer peace of mind alongside so much else: delicious dining, a carefree lifestyle, activities and events, upscale services, a maintenance-free existence and much more. Seniors really can have it all, whether they’re independent living or assisted living.”

A Typical Day In Assisted Living

As you might imagine, there really is no “typical” day because there is no “typical” assisted living resident. Depending on interests, care levels and goals, two residents at the same community can have vastly different experiences from each other. If you’re more active and social, your day might be filled with classes, activities and gatherings with friends. You may enjoy being out and about, mingling with the team members and other residents, and learning new things that are being offered on the community’s events calendar. If you’re wanting a more leisurely, pensive day, you may want to spend time outside enjoying the fresh air or head to the library to read a good book.

Every day in assisted living can look exactly the way you want it. In general, though, here are some of the things that you can expect and enjoy:

Delicious meals three times a day. Gone are the days of institutionalized, bland food. Today, assisted living residents enjoy chef-prepared meals made from fresh ingredients, locally sourced produce and inspired recipes. You don’t have to deal with grocery shopping, cooking or cleaning up. You also don’t have to deal with managing your nutritional needs yourself. An on-staff nutritionist works in tandem with the dining services team to make sure offerings are nutritionally balanced and tailored to meet each individual’s needs and preferences.

Fun and engaging activities. Since you no longer have to worry about things like cleaning, cooking, home maintenance and other chores, your time is now yours to do with as you wish. And you’ll find plenty of things to do at an assisted living community. Lifelong learning, book clubs, fitness classes, art classes … and that’s just for starters. Communities are designed to make life enjoyable, and offering programs, activities and opportunities helps residents stay engaged, fulfilled and happy.

Health and wellness opportunities. Aging well means staying healthy. Assisted living communities are designed from the ground up to provide overall wellness in mind, body and soul. From exercise classes to healthy eating to stimulating activities and socialization opportunities, many assisted living residents find themselves becoming healthier and more independent than they were before moving to the community.

Carefree enjoyment every day. Ultimately, a typical day in assisted living means doing just what you want when you want. It’s a carefree lifestyle filled with enjoyment, friendships and possibility. What could be better than that?

Beautiful Riverfront Community

Located on the banks of the Charles River, Waterstone is Wellesley’s only senior living community, offering premier independent and assisted living. But that’s only the first of many differences that sets Waterstone above and beyond other communities.

Celebrating Dynamic Living

Here, our residents live independently in their own private, spacious apartments – but without any worries or concerns about homeownership or living alone. All meals are expertly prepared. There aren’t any chores to be concerned with. No home maintenance or repairs to worry about. Just opportunities around every corner and time to spend as they choose – in the company of new friends.

Our vibrant community encourages residents to engage in a variety of recreational, cultural and social programs and activities. Enjoy a fitness class. Swim in the sunny indoor pool. Take a stroll on a walking path. Partake in a favorite hobby or pastime. Discover a new interest. With Waterstone at Wellesley, there’s a world of opportunity waiting right outside our residents’ doors.

Confidence of Care

The hallmark of Waterstone assisted living is the peace of mind we provide both our residents and their families. Knowing that care and support are available right on site instills a sense of confidence and calm one can’t find living alone.

For prospective residents or their families interested in residing at Waterstone at Wellesley, please contact us at ​781.591.7113.

Does Mom need assisted living? That’s a question that many adult children – and their parents – find themselves asking at a certain point in the aging journey. On one hand, you may logically realize that assisted living would be a real benefit. On the other hand, you may find yourself saying things like, Dad seems too young for assisted living. or Mom is still healthy, she just needs some help with a few things every day. Even if your loved one is healthy and active, that doesn’t mean they can’t benefit from assisted living, says Devon Sicard, Executive Director of Waterstone at Wellesley.

“Many seniors and their adult children can become resistant when they hear the words assisted living because they have a lot of assumptions that simply aren’t true,” Devon says. “Assisted living isn’t just for older adults who aren’t able to perform the activities of daily life. In fact, assisted living can be home to many active and independent seniors who simply want the peace of mind and convenience a community provides.”

Whatever the situation, when an individual decides to move into senior living, there are a lot of things at play that can be emotionally, mentally and physically taxing. “As an adult child of someone moving into senior living, you will end up playing a major role in the process,” Devon explains. “It can be relatively easy, but it can also be drawn out and difficult – a lot of it will depend on your involvement and how you help in various situations.”

If you’re an adult child of a parent or parents who have decided to move into assisted living, how can you help? What’s the best way to go about things? Here are some of our tried-and-true tips to help you assist a loved one as they prepare and move into this new phase of life.

Tour communities with your parents.
While ultimately the choice of community belongs to your Mom and Dad, it always helps to have another brain and pair of eyes to help narrow down the options and choose the best option for the individual. It’s a good idea, if your parents are amenable to it, to tour the various communities they’ve chosen with them (and maybe on your own, too). Since you won’t be living in the community, you have a different viewpoint on everything and perhaps can shed light on different aspects that your parents might miss. You can also keep track of the positives, negatives and variables at each community, which can help you and your parents sit down and weigh options against each other.

Help them work through the downsizing process.

Once a community has been decided upon, there’s yet another hurdle: downsizing and selling Mom and Dad’s current home. This is in and of itself is a huge undertaking that requires a lot of planning and work. Be a resource for your parents – let them know you’re able and willing to help, which they may need, especially if they haven’t moved in a while. When moving into assisted living, many older adults will need to let go of a significant number of personal items. Being open and available to help your parents – physically and emotionally – can help make the situation a little easier.

Give your parents time to grieve.

Even if you and your parents know that moving into assisted living is the right thing, that doesn’t mean that there aren’t sadness and uncertainty that come with the decision. In a way, moving into assisted living is the closing of one chapter and realizing that Mom and Dad are getting older. Give your parents (and even yourself) a chance to grieve and process the change. But at the same time, understand that this move is a good thing and that it means the start of a new chapter of life that can be embraced to the fullest.

Plan ahead.

It’s always easiest to make plans when there’s a deadline in place. So, the first step is to determine when exactly your parent or loved one intends to move into assisted living. Once you have a general idea, work backward from there. When should you move into the community? When should the house be put on the market to be sold? When should you have everything packed up and ready to go? Even if the move isn’t for six months or longer, it’s good to have a general idea of when your parents want to make the move – that way, you can start putting plans into place to make the transition that much smoother.

Figure out how to move.

The act of moving can be quite stressful. There’s no need to add anxiety and uncertainty to it. Some experts suggest that parents choose and move into assisted living before selling their current home because that simply helps avoid rushing for rushing’s sake. If that works for you, great! If not, work with your parents, their real estate agent and the community staff to coordinate everything in order to transition easily. You may want to see if it’s possible for Mom and Dad to find a temporary space to get the home sold before moving into assisted living. Or, can they move into assisted living and then put plans in order to sell their current home? A lot depends on the individual situation, and there’s no right or wrong answer.

Get their new home ready.

When it comes time for the physical move, adult children can be an enormous help. While there’s a level of excitement that comes with moving, there’s also a level of anxiety – and having someone to talk and work through the process can make it easier, calmer and a lot more fun. Talk with your mom and dad about their new space and how they want their belongings organized. Take measurements of their new apartment or home and work with them to figure out a floor plan that incorporates their necessary items and also cues you into things you might need to buy. Once you have a plan in place, talk with the community staff to see about getting the new home set up – earlier is always preferable.

Clear your schedule.

On moving day, it always helps to have a helping hand – and your parents will appreciate any assistance you can give. Clear your schedule so on the actual day of moving, you can be ready and available to help assist with the moving truck, unpack at the community, clear away trash and detritus and generally help Mom and Dad settle in. Depending on your parent’s abilities and mental state, you may want to talk with the community staff to get their advice and opinions.

Give them space.

Moving your parents into assisted living may make you feel a little sad, anxious and worried – in other words, how they might have felt when you went to college or moved away from home. Although you may want to hover over your parents to see how they’re doing and help them get settled, the best thing to do is, more than likely, give them space to settle in on their own. This can be hard, but staying out of their way will give Mom and Dad the opportunity to adjust to their new lifestyle and start making a new routine.

Moving your parents into assisted living may feel a bit unnerving, especially if you’ve been spending lots of time helping care for them. It’s important to understand that moving them into assisted living isn’t an end – it’s a new beginning. Eventually, you and your parents will find your groove and allow the benefits of their new community to fully blossom … leaving you with peace of mind and the ability to enjoy each day as it comes.

Beautiful Riverfront Community

Located on the banks of the Charles River, Waterstone is Wellesley’s only senior living community, offering premier independent and assisted living. But that’s only the first of many differences that sets Waterstone above and beyond other communities.

Celebrating Dynamic Living

Here our residents live independently in their own private, spacious apartments – but without any of the worries or concerns of homeownership or living alone. All meals are expertly prepared. There aren’t any chores to be concerned with. No home maintenance or repairs to worry about. Just opportunities around every corner and time to spend as they choose – in the company of new friends.

Our vibrant community encourages residents to engage in a variety of recreational, cultural and social programs and activities. Enjoy a fitness class. Swim in the sunny indoor pool. Take a stroll on a walking path. Partake in a favorite hobby or pastime. Discover a new interest. With Waterstone at Wellesley, there’s a world of opportunity waiting right outside our residents’ doors.

Confidence of Care

The hallmark of Waterstone assisted living is the peace of mind we provide both our residents and their families. Knowing that care and support are available right on site instills a sense of confidence and calm one can’t find living alone.

For prospective residents or their families interested in residing at Waterstone at Wellesley, please contact us at ​781.591.7113.

There’s a new trend with today’s seniors taking a new path in life. You can thank the Baby Boomers for that – they’re reinventing what “retired” or “seniorhood” means just as much as they redefined society during their youth. You probably know someone – or perhaps are that someone – who’s decided to pursue a new path exploring their interests in their older years.

“These days, we’re discovering that it’s never too late to find a meaningful path for your life,” says Devon Sicard, Executive Director of Waterstone at Wellesley. “Considering how our interests and desires change throughout the course of our lives, that’s a good thing. Your path at 20 is probably a lot different than your path at 50 or your path at 70. One of the great joys of retirement is that people are discovering they can try new things. For perhaps the first time in their lives, they don’t need to worry or care for the needs of others, only themselves.”

Devon says that some older adults who want to find their “path” but require additional assistance or have health concerns, they should explore assisted living services. “Assisted living services at Waterstone at Wellesley are designed so we can help our residents find their path while also receiving the supportive, dignified care they require,” she says. “We don’t believe that needing help should keep you from discovering your purpose and finding fulfilling pursuits. It’s our goal to get to know each of our residents and discover not just their needs, but their desires, so we can help them find their path in a meaningful, healthy and supportive way.”

“To deliver the most appropriate care and to help support independence, we develop customized care plans for each resident. We provide support with activities of daily living and assistance with medication management. This degree of personalized care allows us to provide close observation of any change in support or health needs, as well as quick intervention to address those changes. At the same time, we provide amenities, activities and events that offer everything our residents need to live active, engaged lives that promote complete health, wellness and fulfillment.”

What’s Your Path?

What’s something you’ve always wanted to learn, pursue or discover? Have you always secretly or not-so-secretly wanted to learn to play guitar? Sculpt? Speak a new language? Your path can be as big and grand or as small and individualized as you want. Finding a passion and a purpose provide a wide variety of health benefits, and it doesn’t matter what your purpose is as long as you have one. Here are a few ideas of things to think about to help you discover what path sounds right and meaningful for you in your retirement years. The nice thing is that you don’t have to choose a path and stick with it forever. If you find out it’s not quite as meaningful or interesting as you thought, you can always try something different – that’s your choice!

A new career.

If you’ve spent decades in the workforce, the idea of working again in retirement may sound like the last thing you want to do. But many retirees find themselves going back to work after several years “off” because they miss having that purpose. While some retirees choose to work on a part-time or contract basis in a similar role (maybe even for their old company), others choose to launch new businesses or start completely different careers in other fields. Maybe you were a successful lawyer in your past, but you’ve always enjoyed helping people put their taxes together. Or perhaps you were a marketing professional who deep down wanted to open a restaurant. Or maybe you want a customer-facing role in a small business. Going back into the workforce is a great way to keep your skills sharp, interact with others and use your extensive knowledge to give back in some way shape or form.

Volunteering.

There are a lot of similarities to going back into the workforce and becoming a volunteer. Many seniors end up becoming very devoted volunteers for worthy organizations because they have the time and financial resources to donate their time without worrying about making a paycheck. Most volunteers would say that this type of work is the most meaningful, as it allows them to make a difference through causes that are the most important to them. Working at an animal shelter, mentoring youth, donating time to a local food bank or Habitat for Humanity … the opportunities are endless.

Strengthening your relationships.

Perhaps you’ll find your path is a little more personal. It could be that you want to spend your golden years building and deepening your relationships with people who mean the most to you. Some seniors choose to move near adult children and grandchildren so they can spend as much time as possible helping their family and watching them grow. Others may spend this time deepening relationships with spouses and lifelong friends. And others may want to branch out and form bonds with like-minded people who share passions or hobbies. Maintaining strong and meaningful connections is one of the best ways to help you age well, stay healthy and keep you looking and feeling young.

Making art.

Creativity is something that all humans have. Deep down, we all have the desire to create beauty and express ourselves in some way. Whether you’re a musician, a creative writer, a talented chef or a great interior designer, the arts provide a sense of purpose and fulfilment that is unmatched. In your senior years, you can actually pursue these creative endeavors without worrying about having to “make it big” (or even make a paycheck). If you’ve enjoyed an artistic passion throughout your years, now is your time to really explore it. Or, if you’ve never thought of yourself as a creative person but have always wanted to learn, you can try a wide variety of hobbies and endeavors until you find the one that truly moves you.

Being a role model.

We usually think of role models as famous people who inspire us to be better. But you don’t have to be a celebrity to be a good role model. For example, you could become a paragon of health, reinventing yourself and showing the world that any age can be the healthiest age of your life. Or you could be a motivational speaker, passing on your knowledge to those who can learn from it. Or you could simply live your best life and make the world a little better place for everyone you meet.

Whatever it is that you’ve always wanted to do, your retirement is the perfect chance to explore and try it. Moving into a community like Waterstone at Wellesley provides seniors with the assistance and support to help make life carefree, along with the time, resources and opportunities for you to explore and find your new path in life.

Beautiful Riverfront Community

Located on the banks of the Charles River, Waterstone is Wellesley’s only senior living community, offering premier independent and assisted living. But that’s only the first of many differences that sets Waterstone above and beyond other communities.

Celebrating Dynamic Living

Here our residents live independently in their own private, spacious apartments – but without any of the worries or concerns of homeownership or living alone. All meals are expertly prepared. There aren’t any chores to be concerned with. No home maintenance or repairs to worry about. Just opportunities around every corner and time to spend as they choose – in the company of new friends.

Our vibrant community encourages residents to engage in a variety of recreational, cultural and social programs and activities. Enjoy a fitness class. Swim in the sunny indoor pool. Take a stroll on a walking path. Partake in a favorite hobby or pastime. Discover a new interest. With Waterstone at Wellesley, there’s a world of opportunity waiting right outside our residents’ doors.

Confidence of Care

The hallmark of Waterstone assisted living is the peace of mind we provide both our residents and their families. Knowing that care and support is available right on site instills a sense of confidence and calm one can’t find living alone.

For prospective residents or their families interested in residing at Waterstone at Wellesley, please contact us at 781.235.1614.